This is a disorganized list of art, artists, facts, and other stuff I find interesting, and think are worth sharing.

 

 

#8~ More Asheville; The Jackson Building

“The 13-story Neo-Gothic style skyscraper was completed in 1924, the first skyscraper in western North Carolina. It was also the tallest skyscraper in all of North Carolina!”

“There are nearly as many styles of architecture throughout the streets of Asheville as there are buildings. No doubt, Asheville was dubbed the “Paris of the South” in the early 1900s for establishing itself as an artisan city with unique style and architectural talent. ”

http://www.romanticasheville.com/jackson_building.htm

 

 

 

 

 

#7~ A bare-knuckle brawl to end hazing

1911

When freshmen entered NC State in 1907, it was a popular practice throughout American campuses for upperclassmen to harass new students through rough discipline and humiliating initiations. Tired of the stunts, the Class of 1911 challenged all of the sophomores “to align themselves on opposite sides of Red Diamond [Pullen Park], and at a signal, lunge at each other with weapons limited to bare fists.” The confrontation relaxed much of the tension for the rest of the year. In addition, the Class of 1911 vowed never to haze students, and observed their promise, causing a “landmark in the history of the college.”

-http://www.ncsu.edu/facilities/buildings/1911.html

 

 

 

 

 

#6~ Briggs Building

bri bri2From http://ncarchitects.lib.ncsu.edu/people/P000037
Briggs and Dodd opened a hardware store on Fayetteville (the main commercial street) in Raleigh in August 1865 and the business prospered and grew. They built the Briggs Building on its present site in 1874, which they cited as the tallest building of its day in eastern North Carolina. Briggs and Dodd’s partnership ended in 1868, and Briggs made his two sons, Thomas Henry, Jr. (1847-1928) and James Augustine, partners in the firm.

According to family tradition, at the beginning of the war, Briggs liquidated all the assets he could into gold and silver coins and put them in lead pipes. Then, the story goes, in 1865, “when Sherman’s Army of the North began to approach the City after leaving Atlanta, which they devastated, Thomas Henry I took his pipes and buried them on a hill near the residence of Col. Thomas Devereau[x].” After the war, Briggs recovered his coins and was immediately ready to expand his business to meet renewed demand for construction.

 

 

#5~ The Hidden Church Imprint

Hidden Church SilhouetteQuoted from… HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROJECT COLLECTION; Creator: WESCOTT, WILLIAM FLYNN

THE HIDDEN CHURCH – 22 CHURCH ST
In the 1850s, the congregation of the “Christian Church” ie “Disciples of Christ” started plans to build a physical church in downtown Asheville. Starting in the 1880s they began construction but ran out of funds selling the building to Cosler & Willis Model Steam Laudry (which eventually became Swannanoa Cleaners) through a series of additions, the original structure bacame swallowed by a brick facade and only the original cruiciform roof was visible to the outside eye.
In 2003 Central United Methodist Church (also on Church St.) bought the building from Swannanoa Cleaners and in 2007 made plans to demolish the building and build a parking lot.

 

#4~ Further reading on Asheville being the Southeasts second largest collection of Art Deco architecture

 

 

#3~ My former Professor, Michael S. Schneider

Math class at Art School…don’t laugh

Relationships of Art, Nature, and Math

 

 

#2~ “Revival Field” – Mel Chin, 1991 – present

Further Reading Check out his installation at the CAM in Wilmington

Ecology and Art and Society

 

 

#1~ “I Like America and America Likes Me” – Joseph Beuys, 1974

Just a snippet of Beuys; search on

Ecology and Art and Society

 

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